Jim Couper’s exhibition at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum FIU
On view Sept. 12 – Nov. 1

“Marjorie Stoneman Douglas’ classic book The Everglades: River of Grass begins with the eloquent sentence There are no other Everglades in the world. These eight words not only express the singularity of her subject, they also imply a warning about the fragility of this unique treasure” said Jim Couper.

“Unfortunately Ms. Douglas’ concern becomes obvious when one sees what has befallen this incomparable wonder in the sixty years since her book was published in 1947.”

“Development, industrial agriculture, water mismanagement, road building and even an attempted airport constructed in the heart of the Everglades provide a sad testament to our treatment of a place so special. It is this remaining beauty and wonder, and my concern for its future, that provide the basis for my work. I want my paintings to reflect a celebration of this treasure, to concentrate on the essence of this hallowed place.”

̶ Jim Couper

This exhibition features a new series of paintings by Jim Couper, professor emeritus in the Department of Art and Art History at FIU, and the founding director of the Art Museum at FIU.

According to Couper, “It’s the experience of the wild landscape, not a picture of it that interests me.” The Florida Everglades are the artist’s favorite place to paint; unfortunately, he has witnessed the Everglades decline over the years.

He stated, “I never feel as inspired as when I am in nature – as far away as possible from any traces of human intervention. My work is a humble acknowledgment of the wonder that is being taken from us.” He made this choice because of concerns for the preservation of what remains of the Everglades. This concern is the conceptual basis for making this body of work, and the Everglades provides an endless source of visual and spiritual inspiration for Couper.

“Marjorie Stoneman Douglas’ classic book The Everglades: River of Grass begins with the eloquent sentence There are no other Everglades in the world. These eight words not only express the singularity of her subject, they also imply a warning about the fragility of this unique treasure,” said Jim Couper.

“Unfortunately Ms. Douglas’ concern becomes obvious when one sees what has befallen this incomparable wonder in the sixty years since her book was published in 1947.”

“Development, industrial agriculture, water mismanagement, road building and even an attempted airport constructed in the heart of the Everglades provide a sad testament to our treatment of a place so special. It is this remaining beauty and wonder, and my concern for its future, that provide the basis for my work. I want my paintings to reflect a celebration of this treasure, to concentrate on the essence of this hallowed place,” adds Couper.jpegjpeg-1

o.c. 42"x101" 2010
o.c. 42″x101″ 2010

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