Strip

Deolinda Aguiar

Nino Cais

Carla Chaim

Pedro França

Erika Malzoni
image: [Erika Malzoni. DÚVIDA, 2014 elásticos 1 x 27 cm]

July 11 – August 15, 2015
pening Reception Saturday, July 11, 7-9 PM

Fredric Snitzer Gallery is pleased to present a group exhibition of five Brazilian artists curated by Erika Malzoni. This is a collective exhibition with invited artists who are part of a group that has engaged in a vigorous discourse about contemporary art in Brazil. The productions, which the curator identifies most with, establish connections with the human body.

Deolinda Aguiar:

I am interested in the idea of collective memory either as an individual or group. As work material I chose to work with clothing and fabrics. The idea of memory becomes vivid in my clothing or found objects in thrift shops. When the thread that holds these pieces begins to fall apart, they are exposed to their own limitations of their basic structures.

The process ends when the plot ceases to exist, disrupting waste lines, wires interlink and the buttons that keep the memory of the piece.

Nino Cais:

Nino Cais sees the world with attentive and wondered eyes, like foreigners and children use to do. The little rituals that govern human relationships, the way people arrange their houses, dress or talk about what was on TV, all about daily life, fascinates him. His creative process is based on visual metaphors in which he mixes up different realms of meaning like house ware and classical sculpture. More than often, we see in Nino’s works, his own body blending with memorabilia and all sorts of objects yielding for insightful and yet enigmatic associations.

Carla Chaim:

Chaim works with different media such as drawing, sculpture, video and

installation. She approaches a wide range of everyday issues in her work, bringing them to the studio to think of new ways and new relations. The work is created in the field of experience, allowing for coincidental, accidental and unexpected connections. The artist works with the notion of control in her pieces, both through pre-­‐established rules and in her physical movements in making a drawing, for example, using the body as an important tool in this process. Chaim does not work thinking about the final result. What deeply interest her are the movements, steps and processes of each work. She defines the rules and parameters and holds them until the end. Her works do not tell stories; they are the process itself, combining dichotomous systems: strict rules and organic physical movements.

Pedro França:

Pedro França is an artist and is part of the Cia Teatral Ueinzz (Ueinzz Theatre Company). He completed his Master degree in History at PUC-­‐Rio, gave Art History and Theory lessons at the Escola de Artes Visuais (School of Visual Arts) in Rio de Janeiro from 2006 and 2011, and currently teaches regular classes at the MAM-­‐SP and the Tomie Othake Institute. In 2010 he was the curator of the Terreiros program at the 29th Biennalle of São Paulo (films, debates and performances). In 2011, he was the curator, together with Fernando Cochiaralle, of the Cavalos de Tróia (Troy Horses) exhibition at the Caos e Efeito (Chaos and Effect) show at Itaú Cultural. França works as an artist since 2011 producing drawings, films and installations.

Erika Malzoni:

Erika Malzoni uses various media as forms of expression. Her work results from her interest in brutal materials, of little or no worth, which are often discarded and found around. These objects from their original functions are employed as modified material to interact with their own purpose/ history or, at times associating new narrative to compose the artistic object. The focus is on drawing and in the connection established by repetition, attraction, superimposed, juxtapositions, projections or penetration of the materials, raising questions such as urgency, time and relationships.

For more information, images of the works, or about the Fredric Snitzer Gallery contact: Richard Arregui at Richard@snitzer.com or call 10 am-­‐ 5pm EST at 305-­‐ 448-­‐8976

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